http://zooophagous.tumblr.com/post/95926696731/aqua-fae-zooophagous-not-sure-which-makes-me

feienopteryx:

wuzzymolecules:

aqua-fae:

wuzzymolecules:

aqua-fae:

zooophagous:

Not sure which makes me rage harder:

People who proudly proclaim that they refuse to support ALS research because they use embryonic stem cells, or the people who proudly proclaim they refuse to support ALS research because they test on mice.

Some people are…

I think it’s funny that people seem to think that laboratory/research animals are treated like garbage and are not cared for. There are rules and stipulations in place. Ethics, guidelines, and safety measures must be followed by researchers. If they aren’t, the program is shut down.
Also, from some googling, from what I can find, the only animal models ALS uses at the moment are worms, flies, fish, mice, and rats. From what I understand, they’ve used primates in the past, but have stopped and there is no funding for primate research in their organization at the moment.
For the future, non-animal research testing would be optimal. ALS is already making strides to create non-animal testing a thing. Every research scientist is. It would be easier, more manageable, and probably more effective. But we are not quite there yet.
So instead of complaining about animal testing, or gosh embryonic stem cell testing (please stop and just take some time to learn some biology), people should find ways to educate themselves about research testing and support methods to produce non-animal research models.

Speaking of funny it’s down right hysterical that you want people to educate themselves on the ethics and execution of animal testing. When you seem to be so vastly uninformed yourself. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/aysha-akhtar/does-pamela-anderson-have_b_5704971.html

I literally work in a research lab. I had to read all the guidelines and rules for animal welfare. I had to meet with the board members of IACUC to discuss how to properly care for laboratory and research animals. I used to be extremely anti-animal testing, until I researched the topic more and learned about animal testing and how there are strict rules in place to keep animals unharmed and free from cruelty.

Also, thanks for the link. I already read that article yesterday! If you had bothered to read my response, you would have noticed that I actually agree with the major point in article- that non-animal models of testing should be produced.
My other main point and what animal rights activist don’t seem to understand is that there are excessive rules in place to keep these animals from harm and cruelty. We need these animals in top care. We don’t just point and laugh at these animals when they are in pain or discomfort. We continually, round the clock observe them for signs of distress and act accordingly.

Also, next time, please try to find scholarly articles, websites, or publications rather than a .com website. It’ll prove much more reliable than a news media website. .edu or .gov or even .org (if you thoroughly research the information) are great places to start.

Lastly, Pamela Anderson is speaking about things that she can not give sources for. Please try to remember this.
Please read up on these links I have provided! I might be able to provide more later but these are the first ones that came to mind and I also have to get ready for my college classes soon.
http://www.nc3rs.org.uk/the-3rs

http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk

https://www.aalas.org/iacuc/laws-policies—guidelines#.U_8zYGK9KK0

http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=891e14e1125910a4ff614b3997fbfbda&c=ecfr&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title09/9cfrv1_02.tpl

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/downloads/awa/awa.pdf

http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12910

THIS. I have worked in an animal research lab as well and I wish more people were educated about what really happens in there instead of spreading a bunch of outdated or manipulated unsourced information to push their ARA agenda.
The regulations vary a lot in different countries but in most countries there are lots of procedures in place to reduce stress or pain for the animals. All and every parts of a research project MUST be approved by an ethics committee, made of different people from different backgrounds, including people who have nothing to do with animal testing. Research labs must obey certains rules and undergo regular inspections by an external ethics group in order to get government funding, which most labs could not survive without. It really is a complex world.
It really does suck that we use animals in our research but it’s also not realistic to say we could do research without animals right now. Some types of research could never be done on artificial specimens even if we were more advanced in technology, and most of the technology we have right now still isn’t enough for most types of research that is done on animals. It’s in the researcher’s best interest not to use live animals, as it is much cheaper and requires less maintenance. It’s also more predictable and reproducible and the external conditions can be controlled more effectively. I do believe we can and will find ways to reduce our use of animals in research eventually, but it’ll require time, and there will always be a certain need for live animals in some types of research (behavior, neurology, teratology, pharmacokinetics, etc).

Glad to see my fellow research scientists speak out against ARA propaganda. I’m just going to leave a few links to posts on the ALF (and why they hurt their own cause), Animal Testing vs Animal Research, PETA’s lies about Animal Research, and my entire Animal Welfare tag.

As a research scientist, Ethologist, and Primatologist, I’m happy to answer any questions someone has on this topic. [Please keep in mind that my monkeys run my life, so it may take me some time to respond]

Also, to all those supporting Pamela Anderson’s outrage at the ALS  ice bucket challenge… perhaps you should take a better look at your animal rights hypocrite heroine. I mean, it’s not like she has Hepatitis C or anything. It’s not like she isn’t alive to share her opinions today thanks to medications created due to animal (specifically chimpanzee) research. It’s not like this disease, which now causes more deaths in the US than HIV/AIDS, has essentially come to a research stand still because chimpanzees were the only viable animal model and alternative models were not given time to develop.  (x, x, x)

Animal researchers want to put themselves out of business. We would love a day when animal research is unnecessary and cellular / mathematical / and computer models are all that is needed to cure the next terrible disease… 
But we aren’t there yet, and people are dying every day from these horrid diseases. Scientists don’t need your scorn, ignorance, and aggression when it comes to animal research. We need the public’s attention, ingenuity, and dedication to creating a world where technological advances allow us to remove animals from biomedical research.

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully EffectOne of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.
— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Actual conversation in my lab:Male coworker: “Why is everyone so obsessed with Scully?She’s not *that special*. Why aren’t they talking about other female scientists in the media?”Me:
*I know there is Bones and The Big Bang Theory, but how about some media featuring women in STEM that aren’t defined by their romantic relationships?

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully Effect

One of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.

Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.

The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.

— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Actual conversation in my lab:
Male coworker: “Why is everyone so obsessed with Scully?She’s not *that special*. Why aren’t they talking about other female scientists in the media?”
Me:


*I know there is Bones and The Big Bang Theory, but how about some media featuring women in STEM that aren’t defined by their romantic relationships?

theolduvaigorge:

survivethrive:

(via Backpacks Infographic: How to Find the Right Backpack - REI)

This is pretty solid. There’s often a small inner pouch on the side that lies against your spine where you can pack the heavy stuff compactly. My Osprey was moulded to my body shape and is designed for people with breasts, so the large straps are oriented slightly differently to make room for boob bulk. If you tighten all the compression straps, tightly pull the straps across your clavicles and waist, and tighten the top bit so the topmost compartment doesn’t sag, the weight will distribute so as to not strain your muscles well beyond all holy hell. It will still be heavy if you pack a great lot but you won’t have that dragging agony on your neck and shoulders, nor will you want to collapse from lower back pain every time you bend and stand. Backpacks aren’t cheap but if you travel often, it’s worth the investment. 

***What to take: dental floss too.

***What to leave: take your hands off my interwebs. I need Google maps, thank you kindly.

I cannot stress how convenient it is to have a pack with a camelbak or other hydration system in it. Using bottles is all well and good, but when you’re all muddy (or worse) you don’t want to use grubby little hands to open up the water bottle. 

The Sounds of Gombe

TheJungleNook
After 40 years, the largest dataset of audiorecordings from free-living chimpanzees is available for researchers and primate enthusiasts alike!
From 1971-1973, Hetty van de Rijt-Plooij and husband Frans X. Plooij collected over 10 hours of chimpanzee vocalizations at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. As their careers progressed, the couple shifted focus to childhood development (Plooij) and physical anthropology (Rijt-Plooij), so the collected recordings got pushed aside, and remained unanalyzed in the attic…until now. 
Before her passing in 2003, Rijt-Plooij requested her husband make the collected recordings available to other researchers… and now he was finally able to fulfill her last wish. The recordings and field notes are now available at Cornell University’s Macaulay Library and the Dryad Repository. 
Hetty Rijt-Plooji, author’s photo for The Wonder Weeks (x)

Example Clips:
Jomeo (subadult) Foodbarks
Fifi (subadult) screams, squeeks, silence (see obs context)
Unidentified Individual laughing, Melissa hoots, Goblin screams, wimper, scream, crying (with inhalation), whimper (very good recordings containing screams with poutface)
Journal Reference:Plooij, Frans X., et al. "Longitudinal recordings of the vocalizations of immature Gombe chimpanzees for developmental studies." Scientific Data 1 (2014). (x)
Photo Source (x)

The Sounds of Gombe

After 40 years, the largest dataset of audiorecordings from free-living chimpanzees is available for researchers and primate enthusiasts alike!

From 1971-1973, Hetty van de Rijt-Plooij and husband Frans X. Plooij collected over 10 hours of chimpanzee vocalizations at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. As their careers progressed, the couple shifted focus to childhood development (Plooij) and physical anthropology (Rijt-Plooij), so the collected recordings got pushed aside, and remained unanalyzed in the attic…until now. 

Before her passing in 2003, Rijt-Plooij requested her husband make the collected recordings available to other researchers… and now he was finally able to fulfill her last wish. The recordings and field notes are now available at Cornell University’s Macaulay Library and the Dryad Repository. 


Hetty Rijt-Plooji, author’s photo for The Wonder Weeks (x)

Example Clips:

Journal Reference:
Plooij, Frans X., et al. "Longitudinal recordings of the vocalizations of immature Gombe chimpanzees for developmental studies." Scientific Data 1 (2014). (x)

Photo Source (x)

candlelightisfire:

So tiny! So cute!

When I’m all numb after a dentist appointment

coffee-n-cats:

Strike a pose. #fossils #paleontology #wyoming #camels

theolduvaigorge:

Working memory constraints on imitation and emulation

  • by Francys Subiaul and Brian Schilder

"Does working memory (WM) constrain the amount and type of information children copy from a model? To answer this question, preschool-age children (N = 165) were trained and then tested on a touch-screen task that involved touching simultaneously presented pictures. Prior to responding, children saw a model generate two target responses: Order (touching all of the pictures on the screen in a target sequence three consecutive times) and Multi-Tap (consistently touching one of the pictures two times). Children’s accuracy copying Order and Multi-Tap was assessed on two types of sequences: low WM load (2 pictures) and high WM load (3 pictures). Results showed that more children copied both Order and Multi-Tap on 2-picture sequences than on 3-picture sequences. Children who copied only one of the two target responses tended to copy only Order on 2-picture sequences but only Multi-Tap on 3-picture sequences. Instructions to either copy or ignore the Multi-Tap response did not affect this overall pattern of results. In sum, results are consistent with the hypothesis that WM constrains not just the amount but also the type of information children copy from models, potentially modulating whether children imitate or emulate in a given task” (read more/open access).

(Open access source: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, in press 2014 via Academia.edu)

***Not human evo, but personal reasons.

“Adorably Cute” Tiny Primate Discovery Illuminates Biodiversity of Philippines Island
Posted by 
David Braun

Meet the Dinagat-Caraga tarsier, a distinctive evolutionary lineage of primate that has just been discovered from the southeastern Philippines, an international team of biologists working with the Philippine government’s Biodiversity Management Bureau announced today. The discovery of the new genetic type of primate was funded in part by the National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration

The discovery identifies an important new example of a “conservation flagship species” that has the potential to increase public awareness of the Philippines’ astounding resident biodiversity, says National Geographic grantee and project leader Rafe Brown, of the University of Kansas. “If protected by the Philippine government, [it may] extend protection like an umbrella to the many species of unique birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, plants, and invertebrates that share its rain forest home.” (continue reading)

FIGURE 1: Phylogeographic relationships ofTarsius syrichta (see Appendix S1 for taxonomic summary)… (x)

Journal Reference:
Brown, Rafe M., et al. "Conservation Genetics of the Philippine Tarsier: Cryptic Genetic Variation Restructures Conservation Priorities for an Island Archipelago Primate." PloS one 9.8 (2014): e104340. (x)

xiphoidprocess:

how it felt to get name-checked in the Washington Post this morning:

image

but in real life people are like:

image

I say we enjoy the boost to our DC cred.